Bröd Glutenfritt

My teff bread – recipe in English

27 april, 2016

Här hittar du inlägget på svenska.

A couple of weeks ago I shared my best gluten free bread recipe ever – or so far – my teff bread. It is the best bread I have ever tasted and baked and I’m really proud that it’s a recipe of my own. Since I received a lot of questions on my instagram account I decided to translate it into English so that you all can enjoy this bread. The more the merrier, as they say. And I hope my translation works well, otherwise all you need to do is ask.

Annelies’ Teff Bread
(1 bread)

Oven heat: 225° C
Time in the oven: 60-70 minutes
Total preparation time: 3-3,5 hours

Ingredients:

20 g fresh yeast
700 g cold water
25 g honey
2 tsp salt
15 g rapeseed oil
(1 egg white – optional)
100 g rice flour
100 g buckwheat flakes
200 g teff flour
55 g corn starch or potato starch
30 g psyllium husk

Instructions:

Combine yeast, cold water, honey, salt and rapeseed oil in a large bowl. (Now you can also add an egg white, it is not a must but the texture of the bread will be slightly better.) Stir the ingredients together with a whisk. Add the rice flour, buckwheat flakes, teff flour and corn starch (or potato starch). I usually use a regular steel whisk to stir all the ingredients until it becomes a smooth mixture without lumps. Finally add the psyllium husk and now it is important to quickly whisk it all together. After a few minutes the dough stabilises and then I usually take a spatula and work the dough so that the bottom layer is incorporated and the dough is smooth. Now cover the bowl and leave to rise for 1.5 hours. Make sure to turn on the oven in time so that it is warm when it’s time to bake the bread.

When the dough is ready, place it to a flour-dusted baking table. Gently mould the dough and form it to a desired shape. Sometimes I make it round, but usually oval since I think it’s easier to cut. Place it on a baking tray, use a cloth to cover the bread and let it prove for a further 30 minutes.

In my oven, I always have a worn tray at the bottom and when I set the bread in place I pour some cold water on it, which forms steam and in the end gives you a beautiful bread.

When the bread is ready and the oven is hot, you can either set the bread directly or, if you prefer, cut the bread. I usually first dust it with some flour and then cut with a bread knife into any pattern. Then it’s time to bake the bread. Open the oven and quickly place the bread tray in the middle of the oven and then pour cold water on the tray in the bottom of the oven. Bake the bread for 60-70 minutes. I always bake my bread for 70 minutes, and generally speaking, gluten-free bread is preferably to be baked a little longer. Let it cool on a wire rack, and as usual with this type of recipe it is most important to let the bread rest in peace and quiet before you eat it. Preferably for 6-8 hours or overnight.

The teff flour is a wonderful gluten free flour (actually a grass) that is healthy, has a mild flavor and adds a kind of whole grain feeling to the bread. I really like it, a lot!

Enjoy!

You Might Also Like

7 Kommentarer

  • Reply Maria 22 april, 2017 at 04:01

    Hi, your breads are really beautiful! Thank you for sharing.
    I see you’re using much more water than I use now, I’ll try it. Also, I bake with sourdough, so I’ll have to turn it to sourdough. Have you ever tried to bake you breads with sourdough?
    Another question. Have you tried tapioca instead of starches?
    Thanks a lot!

    • Reply Annelie Andersson 22 april, 2017 at 18:50

      Hi Maria, first of all thanks for your kind words. No, I don’t usually bake glutenfree sourdough breads but I tried a Levain once. Turned out nice. For me it’s a bit too much effort and I think that this way of baking glutenfree bread gives the best result. Would be great to hear if you turn it into sourdough. Yes, I’ve used tapioca a couple of times but I haven’t replaced starches with it so far. How do you use it? Thanks for your comment!

  • Reply Maria 28 april, 2017 at 20:44

    About tapioca: it’s also a starch, but as far as I know it needs less water, may be acts a little bit different then other starches.
    I just made the dough now, I didn’t have buckwheat flakes, because there is no such thing here :), so I put buckwheat flour, also I substituted half of starch to tapioca. The dough is very interesting. It really holds the shape? I retard it till the morning and I think about baking or in loaf pan or in dutch oven. What do you think?
    Thanks

    • Reply Maria 29 april, 2017 at 10:33

      It’s out of the oven now and it’s beautiful, I baked in pan, after 50 min took it out of the pan and put it on the baking stone. I tried to score it, but it didn’t open, however it has a good oven spring. I have a question about steam: I see you make steam with cold water not hot, do you take the tray with the water out after sometime or just leave it in the oven?
      Thank a lot.

      • Reply Annelie Andersson 29 april, 2017 at 19:29

        Hello Maria, and thanks for your messages. I am really glad you like the recipe. And yes the dough really holds the shape. I never use a pan, I just shape it and even cut it. It really holds together just fine. Correct, I make steam with cold water on the hot tray and leave it there for the whole time. Hope you enjoyed the taste as well :)

        • Reply Maria 29 april, 2017 at 22:06

          I sliced it just now, and it has good crumb, a little bit wet in the bottom, so may be needs more time in the oven on lower temperature, the taste is good too. I made it with 100 gr teff sourdough. I used a pan, because I need it as sandwich bread for a son :)

    Lämna en kommentar